UT Library affiliates now have access to Access Anesthesiology and Access Surgery

Access Anesthesiology and Access Surgery are similar to other McGraw-Hill products available through UT subscriptions – Access Medicine, Access Pharmacy, and Access Surgery. The first title’s subscription cost is shared by UT Libraries and UTMC Department of Anesthesiology. The second title is a complimentary subscription for 1 year starting July 1, 2016.

All titles are designed for medical students, residents and educators.  They all contain relevant select McGraw-Hill textbooks, multimedia files, case studies or case files, practice guidelines, and exam review questions. Each title also contains additional discipline related resources noted in the links above.

 

AccessAnesthesiologyAccess Anesthesiology additionally contains multimedia collection of animations, lectures, and procedural videos, and an integrated drug database.

 

AccessSurgeryAccess Surgery additionally contains an integrated drug database.

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Learning Resource Databaase by the National Library of Medicine (NLM)

The Learning Resource Database includes animated tours, tutorials and other online training material for NLM products and services including PubMed and specific NLM biomedical areas as clinical trials, bioinformatics, cancer, drugs and chemicals, and toxicology.
However, remember that Mulford librarians are at the ready for consultations with your information and research needs!

LRD

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Proxmity searching available at many databases through UT libraries

Have you ever wanted to search for two or more words near each other in a title or abstract? Especially when search phrases or entering two words with AND yielded few or little results?  This may be proved especially frustrating with PubMed, which does not have the option for proximity searching.
Proximity searching is especially useful when searching for concepts containing two or more words that may not necessarily always be found as a single phrase.
Unsure on how proximity searching best works with a particular database? Please do not hesitate to consult with a Mulford reference librarian!

Ebscohost
At least 10 of the 80 Ebscohost research databases may yield good proximity searching .  These databases, freely available to UT affiliates,  include CINAHL, Medline, HealthSource (Nursing Editon), PsychInfo, Risk Management Resource Center, and SocIndex.

The proximity operators are composed of a letter (N or W) and a number (to specify the number of words).

Near Operator (N) – N5 finds the words if they are within five words of one another regardless of the order in which they appear.

Example: television n2 violence would find television violence or violence on television,  but not television may be the culprit in recent high school violence.

Within Operator (W) – In the following example, W8 finds the words if they are within eight words of one another and in the order in which you entered them

Example: James w2 Watson would find James Watson or James Dewey Watson but not Watson James.

In addition, multiple terms can be used on either side of the operator. See the following examples:

  • (cardiopulmonary OR cardiovascular) n2 coagulation 
    Ebscohost Medline retrievals include

    • Impact of retransfusion of blood processed in cell-saver on coagulation versus cardiopulmonary bypass
    • State of cardiovascular and blood coagulation systems during prolonged exposure to extreme stimuli
  • zika w8 (outcomes OR “treatment failure”)
    CINAHL retrievals include

    • Zika Virus and Birth Defects–Reviewing the Evidence for Causality.  (abstract…Prenatal Zika virus infection has been linked to adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes, )
    • Zika Virus and Pregnancy
      (abstract..,.maternal Zika virus infection is associated with adverse neonatal outcomes,)

Web of Science

NEAR/x (More at their help page)

Use NEAR/x to find records where the terms joined by the operator are within a specified number of words of each other. This is true even when the words are across different fields (as title and abstract).
Replace the x with a number to specify the maximum number of words that separate the terms.
If you use NEAR without /x, the system will find records where the terms joined by NEAR are within 15 words of each other. For example, these searches are equivalent:

  • salmon NEAR virus
  • salmon NEAR/15 virus

Embase
NEAR/n
requests terms that are within ‘n’ words of each other in either direction.

NEXT/n requests terms that are within ‘n’ words of each other in the order specified.

Example:
cancer* NEXT/4 cell* NEXT/6 therapy retrieves:
“Interplay between ROS and autophagy in cancer cells, from tumor initiation to cancer therapy”

blood NEXT/2 cardio* NEAR/5 system* retrieves:
”…and vegetative nervous system, disorders of blood coagulation, cardio haemodynamics…”

pneumonia NEXT/2 outcome* NEXT/2 research NEXT/2 team* retrieves:
“pneumonia severity index ≥91, Pneumonia Patient Outcomes Research Team score IV-V or bacteraemic pneumonia…”

(clinical NEXT/2 (application* OR trial) NEXT/10 biomarker* NEXT/10 (treatment OR disease)):ab,ti retrieves:
“studies suggest that MPs may have clinical applications including utility as biomarkers, use in improving cardiovascular disease risk prediction

More examples at http://lib.colostate.edu/howto/others/trunc.html

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Independence Day Hours

Mulford’s hours for this weekend:

Saturday, July 2 –  9:00 am – 9:00 pm (our normal hours)
Sunday, July 3 –    9:00 am – midnight (our normal hours)
Monday, July 4 –    Closed
Tuesday, July 5 –   7:30 am – midnight (our normal hours, continuing to end of July)

Have a relaxing and safe holiday!

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Health Services Research Information Central (HSRIC) – A health services research portal

hsricHSRIC is a valuable resource for those in health services research, behavioral and social sciences, and public health.

General resource include

Topics include

 

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Somatosphere -an interdisciplinary collaborative website covering the intersections of medical anthropology, science and technology studies, cultural psychiatry, psychology, and bioethics

somatosphere

Somatosphere describes itself as “a collaborative website covering the intersections of medical anthropology, science and technology studies, cultural psychiatry, psychology, and bioethics.” Authored by an international group of scholars, Somatosphere articles examine the connections between cultural and social phenomena and scientific, technological, and medical issues. Readers can browse for articles by subject tags, and the site has an especially rich collection of musings on neuroscience, epidemiology, technology, and the pharmaceutical industry. In contrast to many internet blogs, which tend to publish exclusively bite-sized pieces, Somatosphere includes numerous long-reads and a handful of serialized articles. This format allows for in depth explorations on topics including the rise of drug resistant tuberculosis and issues related to neo-natal care. Somatosphere regularly publishes summaries of new journal articles and “web round-ups” to keep readers abreast of recent articles, both scholarly and popular, that are related to the intersections of social science, technology, and science. In addition, the site includes Book Reviews and an occasional Book Forum, in which multiple scholars discuss a new publication. [MMB]

[with permission]
Copyright © 2016 Internet Scout Research Group – http://scout.wisc.edu

 

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Echoes and Evidence: Nursing History and Health Policy Blog

Echoes and Evidence: Nursing History and Health Policy Blog
Echoes&Evidence
How does the history of nursing inform modern-day health care policy?
What insights canwe gain by examining this history that may be helpful
for the future? The Barbara Bates Center for the Study of the History
of Nursing is dedicated to examining these questions and more. Part
of the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Nursing, the Bates Center
holds the largest nursing history archives in the world. Its blog, Echoes
and Evidence, is headed by Bates Center leader Jean C. Whelan, RN,
Ph.D., and authored by an interdisciplinary group of contributors,
including nursing professionals and history professors. These authors
provide thoughtful historical analyses of contemporary health care
issues that often utilize Bates Center archival sources. For example,
historian Lydia Wytenbroek investigates the history of the stethoscope
and illustrates her examination with historical photographs and
advertisements from nursing journals. Echoes and Evidence provides
useful resources and insights for those interested in the history of
nursing, as well as those interested in contemporary public health|
issues. [MMB]Copyright © 2016 Internet Scout Research Group – http://scout.wisc.edu
From the 2016 May 12 post
In Honor of Nurses Week – The Stethoscope: A Tool of Nurses’ Trade since the 1930s

stethoscope

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PMC – A PubMed companion search tool

PubMed Central (PMC) is a repository of voluntarily provided full text peer-reviewed primary research reports in the life sciences. It is easily accessed through PubMed@UT.

pmcPMC (PubMed Central) was launched in 2000 as a free archive for full-text biomedical and life sciences journal articles. It is a repository for journal literature deposited voluntarily by participating publishers, as well as for author manuscripts that have been submitted in compliance with the NIH Public Access Policy and similar policies of other research funding agencies. More at Fact Sheet titled “MEDLINE, PubMed, and PMC (PubMed Central): How are they different?”.

PMC searches differ from PubMed searches in these main ways

  • Author manuscripts in the life sciences that have been voluntarily submitted are included. These select manuscripts are from several thousand journals.
  • Book reviews are included.
  • The Advanced Search page includes options that are not in PubMed.  For example one can search entire articles (Body) and figure/table captions. See PMC Help for more information and tips.

A screen shot of the Advanced Search page

PMCAdvancedSearchNeed a consult with a librarian to use PMC or search more fully the biomedical (or any academic) literature? Do not hesitate to contact a Mulford Librarian. We are here to streamline your efforts in locating information and resources.

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Community Health Status Indicators (CHSI) online tool

Screen Shot 2015-03-16 at 5.17.22 AM

 

From the  12 March 2015 press release 

CDC has released the updated Community Health Status Indicators (CHSI) online tool that produces public health profiles for all 3,143 counties in the United States. Each profile includes key indicators of health outcomes, which describes the population health status of a county and factors that have the potential to influence health outcomes, such as health care access and quality, health behaviors, social factors, and the physical environment.

Each profile includes key indicators of health outcomes, which describes the population health status of a county and factors that have the potential to influence health outcomes, such as health care access and quality, health behaviors, social factors, and the physical environment.

The re-designed online application includes updated peer county groups, health status indicators, a summary comparison page, and U.S. Census tract data and indicators for sub-populations (age groups, sex, and race/ethnicity) to identify potential health disparities.  In this new version of CHSI, all indicators are benchmarked against those of peer counties, the median of all U.S. counties, and Healthy People 2020 targets.  Organizations conducting community health assessments can use CHSI data to:

  • Assess community health status and identify disparities;
  • Promote a shared understanding of the wide range of factors that can influence health; and
  • Mobilize multi-sector partnerships to work together to improve population health.
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iCite: Citation Analysis for PubMed articles, including the Relative Citation Ratio (RCR)

iCiteICite is a PubMed based citation analysis application  [See Caveats below.] Similar citation analysis applications may be found at the UT Library Guide Citation Analyis :Journal Impact. It may be used for only one(1) or as many as 200 citations.  ICite may prove useful in analyzing Pubmed literature search results.

From the  NIH help page

iCite is a powerful web application that provides a panel of bibliometric information for journal publications within a defined analysis group (where an analysis group can consist of a single article or a very large group of articles). The data produced by iCite can be downloaded as a customized report from the dashboard and could be used to understand the influence of articles within an analysis group. An example application for iCite might be to compare how the influence of a portfolio of articles compares to the remaining articles that come out of grants funded by the NIH.The following data are produced using iCite:

  • Total Pubs: Total publications that could be matched in the citation database.
  • Pubs/Year: Publications per year, starting from the year of the earliest publication
  • Cites/Year: Citations per full calendar year after publication, through the end of our records. The displayed values are the max, the mean, the standard error of the mean (SEM), and the median (MED) of the papers in the group. For example, a paper published in June 2012 with 30 citations by the end of 2014 would have 30 citations / 2 full calendar years (2013 and 2014) = 15 cites/year.
  • RCR**: Relative Citation Ratio represents a citation-based measure of scientific influence of one or more articles. It is calculated as the cites/year of each paper, normalized to the citations per year received by NIH-funded papers in the same field and year. A paper with an RCR of 1.0 has received the same number of cites/year as the average NIH-funded paper in its field, while a paper with an RCR of 2.0 has received twice as many cites/year as the average NIH-funded paper in its field. The displayed values are the max, the mean, the standard error of the mean (SEM), and the median (MED) of the papers in the group.
  • Weighted RCR: This is the sum of the RCRs in this portfolio. This weights the article count by influence relative to NIH-funded papers. A highly influential set of articles will have a higher Weighted RCR than Total Pubs, while a set of articles with below-average influence will have a lower Weighted RCR than Total Pubs.

The Relative Citation Ratio is a new metric developed within the Office of Portfolio Analysis (OPA) that represents a citation-based measure of scientific influence of one or more articles. It is calculated as the cites/year of each paper, normalized to the citations per year received by NIH-funded papers in the same field and year. A paper with an RCR of 1.0 has received the same number of cites/year as the median NIH-funded paper in its field, while a paper with an RCR of 2.0 has received twice as many cites/year as the median NIH-funded paper in its field. The displayed values are the average and standard deviation of the papers in the group along with the median.

[Caveats] iCite is limited to analyzing only articles that appear in PubMed; users upload the PubMed IDs for articles within the analysis group of interest (articles identified from either SPIRES or PubMed searches). Citation data are drawn from several data sources: PubMed Central, European PubMed Central, CrossRef, and Web of Science. At present, only PubMed citations are included, so citations appearing from journals outside PubMed are not counted. iCite allows for the analysis of just one group of articles or for the comparison of two separate groups as appropriate.

        [The article goes on to give examples of how one can gather data from one or more articles from PubMed.]

The results will be similar to this

iciThis Help page also includes caveats as what is counted as an article (as clinical trials, but not reviews), coverage, and accuracy.  Additional information includes article level data and customization options.

**[Preprint] Relative Citation Ratio (RCR): A new metric that uses citation rates to measure influence at the article level Bruce Ian Hutchins, Xin Yuan, James M Anderson, George M Santangelo

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